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29 December 2006

PizzaQ!!! help Easter Bunny find Shortest Path to give Fabergé Easter Eggs to 13 lucky kids!

Yes, of course, click.

Okay, this should give ramanuJohn and everybody who reads Vleeptron
in Cafe Internet Sofia plenty of time to win some Pizza -- hmmm this time a whole Large from Florentina's (best in town) with 3 toppings of the winner's choice. Mushrooms. Anchovies. Pineapple. Whatever the winner's heart desires.


Of course the first question to tackle is: How many unique Paths could the Easter Bunny possibly hop? (How many Paths do you have to sum and analyze?) 1 slice plain pizza for first correct answer just to that.

As before with Santa's Toy Night,

* the Earth is Flat,

* Easter Bunny Centre is at the center at x = 0 and y = 0 .

* The map is laid out in standard Cartesian x-y coordinates,

* the units are Kilometers, and

* the Easter Bunny always hops in a straight line between two children.

I forget when (Western churches) will celebrate Easter Sunday 2007. It's some kind of Mel Gibson Tequila Car Accident between a primitive farmer's Lunar Calendar and the Reformed Gregorian Solar Calendar. The Vleeptron Advanced Mathematics Research Institute (VAMRI) will return to this matter within the next few weeks.

But first correct answer (Path and Path Length in Km to 2 decimal places of precision) wins the Pizza.

You can do this. Really. YOU CAN DO THIS.

Or better yet -- you don't have to. Let your ordinateur do it for you whilst you sleep or play pool or get into some kind of Affengesselschaft.

After the Easter Bunny seized control of Russia and assassinated the Tsar and Tsarina and their children, the Easter Bunny stole all the Fabergé Easter Eggs the Romanovs used to give each other as Easter presents.

But this Easter he's giving them back to these 13 lucky girls and boys!

Of course Peter Carl Fabergé didn't do all the work himself, he had a studio of dozens of craftsmen in St. Petersburg. Each craftsman would spend weeks or months creating one of these fantasies in precious jewels and precious metals. Then he would bring it to Fabergé for the master's approval.

Fabergé would closely examine the work. If Fabergé didn't think it was perfect, he would smash it to a million bits with a huge hammer, right there in front of the man who made it.

4 comments:

Jim Olson said...

The calculation of Easter in any particular year is simple. It is the first Sunday after the first full moon after the spring equinox. (Don't ask about bissextile years, it throws the calculations off one and there is a false correction). Calculating it for any year, and its history, is quite complex.

http://www.ortelius.de/kalender/east_en.php

We have to know this in order to graduate from Seminary.

Jim Olson said...

For those of you with a Wikipedia fetisch,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computus

Note the careful explanation of the difference between the actual and the nominal (ecclesiastical) assumptions of the dates of the vernal equinox and the full moon.

Jim Olson said...

And finally, the solution to the problem as presented by the Faith and Order Commission of the World Council of Churches. I was an observer at this event.

http://www.oikoumene.org/index.php?id=2677

Bob Merkin said...

so what's the shortest path for the Easter Bunny? time's a-wastin'! Easter's coming!

See post after this one for comments re the calculation of Easter Sunday. We all have Sacred Texts. Mine's Knuth.